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Cognitive Behavioral Interventions for Substance Abuse

Cognitive Behavioral
Interventions
for
Substance Abuse
Overview Presentation
TASC Conference 2013
University of Cincinnati
Corrections Institute
Curriculum Content,
Format
and
Supporting Research
Curriculum Organization
• Introduction and Preparation Material
• Pretreatment Modules (optional)
• Modules 1-6
• Participant Worksheets
Mod 1
(5)
Motivation &
Engagement
Mod 2
(4)
Cognitive
Restructuring
Mod 3
(8)
Emotion
Regulation
Mod 4
(11)
Social
Skills
Mod 5
(4)
Problem
Solving
Mod 6
(7)
Relapse
Prevention
Optional: Pre-Treatment Mod (3)
Group Structure
• Ideal size: 8-10 (Max:16 = 2 facilitators)
• Group time: 1.25-1.50 hours
• Modified closed group: entry points with
pre-requisites, pages 11-13
• Preparation requirement: ~30 minutes
• Homework: a key to transfer of practice
Session Format
• Session background – Facilitator notes
• Session materials
• Practice work review
• Group discussion and activities
• Practice work assignment
Who May Deliver CBI-SA?
• Individuals who have successfully
completed CBI-SA training
• Preference to substance abuse
professionals
• State regulations may prohibit those
without certification or licensure
Who Would Benefit
from CBI-SA?
• Clients who score MODERATE or HIGH
need in the substance use domain
• Admission does not require a substance
use disorder diagnosis
• Those with substance abuse or
dependence diagnosis are appropriate
How is the term “Substance
Abuse” used in the
Curriculum?
• Substance abuse leads to impairment in
some aspect of functioning
• Individual may or may not be
dependent on substances
• Current substance use (unless in a
controlled environment)
Is Abstinence Required?
• Abstinence is not required – programs
will use their own policies
• Safety could warrant banning
participants currently under the
influence
• Drug testing is often used to monitor,
but positive results are evidence of the
need for treatment

Drugs Work in Two Ways
Mimicking
the Neurochemical
Processes
Increasing Action
of Endogenous
Transmitters
How it Works
• Dopamine affects pleasure center of
brain
• Stimulates the release of dopamine at a
rapid rate
• Experience of pleasure
• Over time results in dopamine depletion
Reward Pathway Survival
Craving
• The brain becomes active when a
person with addiction sees or hears
stimuli that trigger craving
• Individuals who suffer from addiction
can learn how to manage cravings

Craving
Cocaine
Rush, High and Craving Peaks
3 Minutes 11 Minutes 12th Minute
Rush High
Cognitive-Behavioral
Interventions
for
Substance Abuse
Motivational Engagement
Cognitive-Behavioral
Social Learning – Emotion
Regulation, Social Skills,
Problem Solving
Relapse Prevention
We Poured
Elements of
Effective
Intervention into
the Curriculum
Stages of Change
Precontemplation
C
R
I
S
I
S
Contemplation
Determination
Action
Relapse Maintenance
Stages of
Change
Project MATCH
CBT MET
12 Step Facilitation
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/match.htm
Research on
12 Step Programs
2 Controlled Studies
Mandatory AA with
Offenders
No Beneficial
Outcomes
Self-Help and Support Network
• Self-Help compliments and extends
treatment effects
• Examples include 12 Step, SMART
Recovery, Women for Sobriety
• Support is key – type of support can
vary (church, family/friends, community
groups)
MI + CBT compared to
CBT alone for Cocaine TX
• Attended more sessions
• Reported greater desire for abstinence
• Reported expectation of success
• Expected greater difficulty in
maintaining abstinence
• No differences on cocaine use
McKee, et al., (2007)
Cognitive-Behavioral
Treatment (CBT)
Trigger Use
THOUGHTS
FEELINGS
BEHAVIORS
Cognitive-Behavioral
Treatment (CBT)
Trigger Refuse
THOUGHTS
FEELINGS
BEHAVIORS
Reinforcement
Pavlov Video
SA is Reinforcing
Positive Reinforcement
Social
Situation +
Substance
Use Pleasure
Negative Reinforcement
Stressful
Situation +
Substance
Use
Reduced
Unpleasant
Feeling
Charlie Brown and Lucy
Motivational Incentives
http://www.bettertxoutcomes.org/motivationalincentives/PAMI.html
Marijuana Abstinence
Post-Treatment
Use of Lower Cost Items
• Petry (2000) has shown lower but still
significant benefits from low cost
incentives
• Use of fishbowl, refund of fees, etc.
• Socio-economic status did not change
efficacy of incentives
Contact Information
• University of Cincinnati-UCCI
• Kelly Pitocco – kelly.pitocco@uc.edu
• 513.502.8999

Next Post
20th National TASC Conference on Drugs, Crime & Reentry

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